Immunizations save lives.

Immunizations are the best way to help protect you and your child from certain diseases. Most are given as shots. They are sometimes called vaccines or vaccinations.

Why should we get vaccinated?

  • Vaccines protect us from dangerous diseases
  • They help keep others from getting diseases
  • Children need them to get into school or day care
  • Adults may need them for jobs or for travel to another country

Getting vaccinated costs less than getting treated for the disease. The risk of getting a disease is much greater than the risk of having a bad reaction to the vaccine.

Vaccines need to be started soon after birth. They are given at certain ages. Some vaccines need extra doses, called booster shots, given later. Children, teens and adults need vaccines. Talk to your healthcare provider about when to get recommended vaccines.

It is important to keep up-to-date vaccine records. Your healthcare provider keeps official immunization records. Keeping personal records also is important. This should include a list of any reactions to the vaccines. You may need to show proof of vaccinations to enroll your child in school or daycare. Your child may also need the record later in life for college, a job or travel.

You can use an immunization tracker like this – http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/records-requirements.html.

You can find your own immunization record online.

WHAT VACCINES SHOULD ADULTS GET?

The vaccines you need as an adult depend on many things. For example – your age, lifestyle, overall health, pregnancy and travel plans.

They also depend on who you are in close contact with. Also, what vaccines you had as a child can make a difference. Talk to your doctor or nurse about which vaccines you need.

Common adult vaccines include –

  • Flu
  • Pneumococcal
  • Shingles (Zoster)
  • Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis

To find more information about certain vaccines, go to www.cdc.gov/vaccines and select Vaccines & Preventable Diseases. If you have more questions, contact Quartz. Call the Immunization Program Coordinator at (608) 821-4894, toll-free at (866) 884-4601, Ext. 54894.

Immunizations save lives. They are the best way to help protect you and your child from certain diseases. Most are given as shots. They are sometimes called vaccines or vaccinations.

Why should we get vaccinated?

  • Vaccines protect us from dangerous diseases
  • They help keep others from getting diseases
  • Children need them to get into school or day care
  • Adults may need them for jobs or for travel to another country

Getting vaccinated costs less than getting treated for the disease. The risk of getting a disease is much greater than the risk of having a bad reaction to the vaccine.

Vaccines need to be started soon after birth. They are given at certain ages. Some vaccines need extra doses, called booster shots, given later. Children, teens and adults need vaccines. Talk to your healthcare provider about when to get recommended vaccines.

It is important to keep up-to-date vaccine records. Your healthcare provider keeps official immunization records. Keeping personal records also is important. This should include a list of any reactions to the vaccines. You may need to show proof of vaccinations to enroll your child in school or daycare. Your child may also need the record later in life for college, a job or travel.

You can use an immunization tracker like this – http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/records-requirements.html.

You can find your own immunization record online.

WHAT VACCINES SHOULD ADULTS GET?

The vaccines you need as an adult depend on many things. For example – your age, lifestyle, overall health, pregnancy and travel plans.

They also depend on who you are in close contact with. Also, what vaccines you had as a child can make a difference. Talk to your doctor or nurse about which vaccines you need.

Common adult vaccines include –

  • Flu
  • Pneumococcal
  • Shingles (Zoster)
  • Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis

To find more information about certain vaccines, go to www.cdc.gov/vaccines and select Vaccines & Preventable Diseases. If you have more questions, contact Quartz. Call the Immunization Program Coordinator at (608) 821-4894, toll-free at (866) 884-4601, Ext. 54894.