A Rainbow Crossing America

  • June 06, 2019
  • |Quartz
|
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June is LGBTQ+ Pride Month. Events and parades are organized to celebrate the contributions of gay, lesbian, transgender, bisexual, queer and more (LGBTQ+) communities, as well as to show support of equal rights and opportunities for LGBTQ+ Americans.

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ+) Pride Month

Every June since the Stonewall Inn riots1 in 1969, people in towns and cities across America come together to show their support for LGBTQ+ rights, culture and communities.

LGBTQ+ Pride Month is a time to recognize the vast contributions these communities have made to our country and to raise awareness of the many issues still affecting the LGBTQ+ community. The LGBTQ+ community and allies celebrate these contributions with parades and celebrations around the globe.

A Rainbow Crossing America

The sun is out and shining bright throughout the American sky. In it, glows a rainbow that stands out, making it look even prettier. A rainbow means happiness and with it, a full spectrum of joy, diversity, courage, professionalism, resilience and much more!

Waving Colors

The many colors embedded in the rainbow flag have become an emblem for the LGBTQ+ community worldwide. Its story describes the reasons why it plays an important role.

The creator of the rainbow flag, Gilbert Baker, stated in an interview with The Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA) “A flag is different than any other form of art. It’s not a painting, it’s not just cloth, it is not just a logo — it functions in so many different ways. I thought that we needed that kind of symbol, that we needed as a people something that everyone instantly understands. The Rainbow Flag doesn’t say the word “Gay,” and it doesn’t say “the United States” on the American flag but everyone knows visually what they mean. And that influence really came to me when I decided that we should have a flag, that a flag fit us as a symbol, that we are a people, a tribe if you will. And, flags are about proclaiming power, so it’s very appropriate.”

Quick Facts

  • On May 30, 2014, President Obama issued Proclamation No. 9136 for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month. In this proclamation, the President pointed: “We celebrate victories that have affirmed freedom and fairness, and we recommit ourselves to completing the work that remains.3
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month (LGBT Pride Month) is celebrated each year during the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall uprising in Greenwich Village.
  • In 1994, a coalition of education-based organizations in the United States designated October as LGBT History Month. In 1995, a resolution passed by the General Assembly of the National Education Association included LGBT History Month within a list of commemorative months. LGBT History Month is also celebrated with annual month-long observances of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history, along with the history of the gay rights and related civil rights movements. National Coming Out Day (October 11), as well as the first “March on Washington” in 1979, are commemorated in the LGBT community during LGBT History Month. 4

Sources:
1 mashable.com/2014/06/10/pride-parade-evolution/
2 moma.org/explore/inside_out/2015/06/17/moma-acquires-the-rainbow-flag/
3 loc.gov/law/help/commemorative-observations/pride.php
4 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month (link: loc.gov/lgbt-pride-month/)

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